Archive for the ‘Out of Band (OOB) Management’ Category

SuperMicro ipmicfg utility on Linux

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

SuperMicro have a nice little utility called ipmicfg, which can be used to interact with the IPMI BMC from within your operating system. This can do all sorts of things with the IPMI BMC, however it’s really useful if you want to change the IP address details on the IPMI card without rebooting your system and going into the BIOS setup.

To get started, download the latest version of ipmicfg from the SuperMicro FTP site (currently it’s ftp://ftp.supermicro.com/utility/IPMICFG/ipmicfg_1.14.3_20130725.zip).

Unzip this and you will find DOS, Linux and Windows versions of the ipmicfg tool, as well as a bit of documentation. I’m only really interested in the Linux version, so lets go into that folder, where you will find 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

There are two binary files included – “ipmicfg-linux.x86_64” which is dynamically linked and “ipmicfg-linux.x86_64.static” which is statically linked. The dynamically linked version normally works fine for me.

As a quick example of how to use ipmicfg, lets change the IPMI BMC IP address from being assigned via DHCP to being statically configured to 192.168.1.2 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 and the default gateway set to 192.168.1.1:

./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -dhcp off
./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -m 192.168.1.2
./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -k 255.255.255.0
./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -g 192.168.1.1

When you run ipmicfg, you may see errors along the lines of:

[kcs] kcs_error_exit:

[kcs] kcs_error_exit:

[kcs] kcs_error:

[kcs] kcs_error_exit:

This essentially means that ipmicfg is having problems communicating with the IPMI BMC, and can normally be resolved by installing the IPMI drivers and loading into the kernel. On CentOS you can do this with the following commands:

yum -y install OpenIPMI
service ipmi start
chkconfig ipmi on

Avocent Cyclades ACS console server password reset or reset unit factory defaults

Saturday, November 6th, 2010

The Avocent Cycaldes ACS console servers are great little units that run Linux and even give you full root console access. The root password is “tslinux” by default, but if it has been changed then you can boot the unit into single user mode by supplying the argument “single” to the Linux kernel selection during the boot process (make sure you put a space between the existing Kernel parameters and “single”) which will drop you to a root prompt.

On my unit, this line comes up as right at the start of the boot process:

Linux/PPC load: root=/dev/ram ramdisk=0x0001F000

So you would type ” single” (remember the space!) to give you:

Linux/PPC load: root=/dev/ram ramdisk=0x0001F000 single

Then just hit enter and the unit will boot up into single user mode and give you the root prompt.

At this point, if you want to restore the entire unit to the factory default settings which will erase all of the configuration, then just run “defconf” and then reboot the unit.

If you want to keep the existing configuration intact but just reset the password then you can just use the traditional Linux passwd tool to edit /etc/passwd:

[root@(none) /]# passwd
New password:
Re-enter new password:
Password changed
[root@(none) /]# saveconf
Checking the configuration file list…
Compressing configuration files into /tmp/saving_config.tar.gz … done.
Saving configuration files to flash … done.
[root@(none) /]# reboot
[root@(none) /]# Restarting system.