Archive for December, 2013

SolusVM displaying wrong disk usage statistics for Xen PV VMs

Sunday, December 29th, 2013

Recently some of our Xen PV VMs started to show strange disk space usage statistics in SolusVM – despite there being plenty of space left on the disk in the VM, SolusVM was reporting that the disk was nearly full!

I struggled to find any public information about this, but apparently it is a known problem with SolusVM and the version of the “df” utility used in RHEL/CentOS 6.5. There have been some slight changes to the way that df displays its output and this causes SolusVM to interpret the disk usage figures incorrectly.

SolusLabs have posted a workaround for this at http://bin.soluslabs.com/1083/38662948/raw/ and I’m reproducing it here for posterity as well as in the hope that it will get indexed:

Fix for Xen PV disk usage showing 100% when using a CentOS 6.5 host node
========================================================

The “df” output in CentOS 6.5 has changed. You may notice this when you upgrade you’re host node from CentOS 6.4. All the Xen PV virtual servers will show 100% disk space used.

On the affected host node edit /usr/local/solusvm/data/advanced.conf and add the following line:

XENFIXCENTOS6DF=”1″

Then run these commands:

wget https://www.dropbox.com/s/j8nu3ye09x9ehwq/command.php -O /usr/local/solusvm/www/command.php
wget https://www.dropbox.com/s/93hsnzzmpwny3r4/solusvmc-xen -O /usr/local/solusvm/core/solusvmc-xen
chmod 6777 /usr/local/solusvm/core/solusvmc-xen

Now when you reboot a virtual server (with the reboot button) the disk usage should update correctly.

SuperMicro ipmicfg utility on Linux

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

SuperMicro have a nice little utility called ipmicfg, which can be used to interact with the IPMI BMC from within your operating system. This can do all sorts of things with the IPMI BMC, however it’s really useful if you want to change the IP address details on the IPMI card without rebooting your system and going into the BIOS setup.

To get started, download the latest version of ipmicfg from the SuperMicro FTP site (currently it’s ftp://ftp.supermicro.com/utility/IPMICFG/ipmicfg_1.14.3_20130725.zip).

Unzip this and you will find DOS, Linux and Windows versions of the ipmicfg tool, as well as a bit of documentation. I’m only really interested in the Linux version, so lets go into that folder, where you will find 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

There are two binary files included – “ipmicfg-linux.x86_64” which is dynamically linked and “ipmicfg-linux.x86_64.static” which is statically linked. The dynamically linked version normally works fine for me.

As a quick example of how to use ipmicfg, lets change the IPMI BMC IP address from being assigned via DHCP to being statically configured to 192.168.1.2 with a subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 and the default gateway set to 192.168.1.1:

./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -dhcp off
./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -m 192.168.1.2
./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -k 255.255.255.0
./ipmicfg-linux.x86_64 -g 192.168.1.1

When you run ipmicfg, you may see errors along the lines of:

[kcs] kcs_error_exit:

[kcs] kcs_error_exit:

[kcs] kcs_error:

[kcs] kcs_error_exit:

This essentially means that ipmicfg is having problems communicating with the IPMI BMC, and can normally be resolved by installing the IPMI drivers and loading into the kernel. On CentOS you can do this with the following commands:

yum -y install OpenIPMI
service ipmi start
chkconfig ipmi on